What You Need To Know About Sulforaphane And Its Association With Broccoli
(And Other Cruciferous Vegetables)

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While the word “sulforaphane” may not be a household name, research in the medical community has spurred conversations about its potential health-promoting benefits. So let’s start with the basics:

Sulforaphane is a compound that is typically associated with broccoli and broccoli sprouts, as well as other cruciferous vegetables like Brussels sprouts, arugula and cauliflower. This is because these vegetables provide the necessary ingredients for sulforaphane production: a glucosinolateA substance found in a wide variety of cruciferous vegetables that, when transformed by the enzyme myrosinase, becomes an isothiocyanate, like sulforaphane, which is responsible for the vegetables’ bitter taste. called glucoraphanin (also known as sulforaphane glucosinolate), and an enzyme called myrosinase.

Sulforaphane, which is known as an isothiocyanateAn organic compound that lends to the bitter taste in cruciferous vegetables that is produced by the enzymatic conversion of metabolites called glucosinolates., is formed when myrosinase transforms glucoraphanin. In plant cells, glucoraphanin and myrosinase are kept separate and only interact when these cells are damaged (i.e. chewed), allowing the components to come together and for the transformation to proceed.

What Are The Benefits Of Sulforaphane?

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Sulforaphane offers numerous health-promoting benefits, which are likely due to its positive effect on multiple cellular pathways:

Supports Cellular Detoxification*

Sulforaphane increases the production of certain Phase II detoxifying enzymes which help to process potentially harmful environmental toxins into less harmful metabolites that can be more easily excreted from the body. In doing so, sulforaphane promotes the detoxification of certain environmental toxins to which you may be exposed every day that can cause damage to your DNA, proteins and lipids.

Promotes Long-Lasting Antioxidant Activity to Reduce Oxidative Stress*

Oxidative stress occurs when there is an imbalance in the production of free radicals and your body’s ability to detoxify their harmful effects by neutralizing them with antioxidants. Free radicals, which can damage DNA, proteins and lipids, are byproducts of your normal metabolism and can also be derived from certain environmental toxins. Sulforaphane boosts the production of antioxidative enzymes which reduce oxidative stress, thereby acting indirectly as an antioxidant. Its benefits have been shown to last more than 24 hours.

Why Can't I Just Eat Broccoli?

Click and Discover

Since sulforaphane is associated with cruciferous vegetables, namely broccoli and broccoli sprouts, many people think they can get the benefits of sulforaphane just by eating their vegetables. Unfortunately, it isn’t that simple, as sulforaphane itself is not found in broccoli. Rather it is the essential ingredients, glucoraphanin and myrosinase, that are present. Unfortunately, there may not be enough of either compound in the plant to allow for adequate sulforaphane production. This can be due to seed quality, soil composition, the age of the plant, and many other factors.

Additionally, any myrosinase enzyme that is present in the plant can be destroyed during the cooking process. So while glucoraphanin and the myrosinase enzyme can be found in the vegetables you eat, the ones you buy from the market are not necessarily reliable sources of either compound.

Doesn't My Body Provide Myrosinase?

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You may have heard that some people are lucky enough to have myrosinase produced by the bacteria in their gut. While this may be true, it is important to realize that myrosinase enzyme levels and activity can vary greatly depending on your diet, sleeping habits, stress levels, any medications you may be taking and other factors.

Remember, the conversion of glucoraphanin into sulforaphane only happens with active myrosinase, so if you don’t have adequate amounts of active myrosinase you may not produce sulforaphane.

Avmacol® and Sulforaphane

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The Avmacol brand contains both glucoraphanin and active myrosinase enzyme, the essential ingredients needed to promote sulforaphane production.*

Avmacol products are supported with human research. Our exclusive Sulforaphane Production System® is validated in humans by measuring metabolites of sulforaphane collected in the urine. This human data has shown that Avmacol® creates a range of sulforaphane production, with an average of 44 micromoles of sulforaphane per recommended serving.* It is important to recognize that individual results may vary due to influences of diet, microflora, metabolism, and other factors. Because of the Sulforaphane Production System exclusive to Avmacol, numerous researchers have chosen this product for clinical studies worldwide.



*Human data reporting an average of 44 micromoles of sulforaphane per recommended serving applies only to Avmacol® Sulforaphane Production System Coated and Uncoated Tablets.

What You Need To Know About Sulforaphane And It’s Association With Broccoli

(And Other Cruciferous Vegetables)

While the word “sulforaphane” may not be a household name, research in the medical community has spurred conversations about its potential health-promoting benefits. So let’s start with the basics:

Sulforaphane is a compound that is typically associated with broccoli and broccoli sprouts, as well as other cruciferous vegetables like Brussels sprouts, arugula and cauliflower. This is because these vegetables provide the necessary ingredients for sulforaphane production: a glucosinolate called glucoraphanin (also known as sulforaphane glucosinolate), and an enzyme called myrosinase.

Sulforaphane, which is known as an isothiocyanate, is formed when myrosinase transforms glucoraphanin. In plant cells, glucoraphanin and myrosinase are kept separate and only interact when these cells are damaged (i.e. chewed), allowing the components to come together and for the transformation to proceed.

What Are The Benefits
Of Sulforaphane?

Sulforaphane offers numerous health-promoting benefits, which are likely due to its positive effect on multiple cellular pathways:

Supports Cellular Detoxification*
Sulforaphane increases the production of certain Phase II detoxifying enzymes which help to process potentially harmful environmental toxins into less harmful metabolites that can be more easily excreted from the body. In doing so, sulforaphane promotes the detoxification of certain environmental toxins to which you may be exposed every day that can cause damage to your DNA, proteins and lipids.

Promotes Long-Lasting Antioxidant Activity to Reduce Oxidative Stress*
Oxidative stress occurs when there is an imbalance in the production of free radicals and your body’s ability to detoxify their harmful effects by neutralizing them with antioxidants. Free radicals, which can damage DNA, proteins and lipids, are byproducts of your normal metabolism and can also be derived from certain environmental toxins. Sulforaphane boosts the production of antioxidative enzymes which reduce oxidative stress, thereby acting indirectly as an antioxidant. Its benefits have been shown to last more than 24 hours.

Why Can't I Just
Eat Broccoli?

Since sulforaphane is associated with cruciferous vegetables, namely broccoli and broccoli sprouts, many people think they can get the benefits of sulforaphane just by eating their vegetables. Unfortunately, it isn’t that simple, as sulforaphane itself is not found in broccoli. Rather it is the essential ingredients, glucoraphanin and myrosinase, that are present. Unfortunately, there may not be enough of either compound in the plant to allow for adequate sulforaphane production. This can be due to seed quality, soil composition, the age of the plant, and many other factors.

Additionally, any myrosinase enzyme that is present in the plant can be destroyed during the cooking process. So while glucoraphanin and the myrosinase enzyme can be found in the vegetables you eat, the ones you buy from the market are not necessarily reliable sources of either compound.

Doesn't My Body Provide Myrosinase?

You may have heard that some people are lucky enough to have myrosinase produced by the bacteria in their gut. While this may be true, it is important to realize that myrosinase enzyme levels and activity can vary greatly depending on your diet, sleeping habits, stress levels, any medications you may be taking and other factors.

Remember, the conversion of glucoraphanin into sulforaphane only happens with active myrosinase, so if you don’t have adequate amounts of active myrosinase you may not produce sulforaphane.

Avmacol® and Sulforaphane

The Avmacol brand contains both glucoraphanin and active myrosinase enzyme, the essential ingredients needed to promote sulforaphane production.*

Avmacol products are supported with human research. Our exclusive Sulforaphane Production System® is validated in humans by measuring metabolites of sulforaphane collected in the urine. This human data has shown that Avmacol® creates a range of sulforaphane production, with an average of 44 micromoles of sulforaphane per recommended serving.* It is important to recognize that individual results may vary due to influences of diet, microflora, metabolism, and other factors. Because of the Sulforaphane Production System exclusive to Avmacol, numerous researchers have chosen this product for clinical studies worldwide.





*Human data reporting an average of 44 micromoles of sulforaphane per recommended serving applies only to Avmacol® Sulforaphane Production System Coated and Uncoated Tablets.